State

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call June 24

6/24/2020 Call recording

 
Speakers: 


ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE TODAY

State Advocacy:

Federal Advocacy:

Resources:

If your landlord is trying or threatening to evict you between now and August 2nd, that is illegal in most cases, and the Attorney General's office is enforcing this. You can file a legal complaint with the AG here.  And here is the link to the form in Spanish.

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call June 3

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call June 3

6/03/2020 call recording

Speakers:

 

TAKE ACTION TODAY: 

State Advocacy:

  • Sign this petition in support of our 12 requests to Governor Inslee and share it with at least 10 people in your networks! Read the full letter here.
  • Once you've signed the letter, email or Tweet at the Governor (@GovInslee, @WAStateGov) to thank him for extending the eviction moratorium FOR 60 DAYS!

Federal Advocacy:

Resources:

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call May 27

 

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call May 27

Link to the 5/27/2020 call recording.

 

Speakers on the 5/27/2020:   
Sara Rankin, Seattle University: rankins@seattleu.edu
Tristia Bauman, National Law Center on Poverty and Homelessness: tbauman@nlchp.org
Katara Jordan, Building Changes: katara.jordan@buildingchanges.org
Tedd Kelleher, Dept. of Commerce: tedd.kelleher@commerce.wa.gov

 

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE TODAY! 

State Advocacy:

Sign on to our organizational sign-on letter to Gov. Inslee! Read our full letter here

Once you've done that, sign this individual petition and share it with at least 10 people in your networks! Once you've signed the letters, use Twitter to call on the Governor (@GovInslee, @WAStateGov) to take action and help Washington residents stay housed, healthy, and safe! Just use the hashtags #WeNeedMoreTime and or #ExtendEvictionBan.
 

Federal Advocacy:

 

Resources:

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 05/20/2020

 
Speakers on the 5/20/20 Call:
  
 
ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE TODAY! 
  • Send an email to thank your Congress members for sponsoring the Emergency Rental Assistance & Rental Market Stabilization Act! For those who did not sponsor, please ask them to sign on or publicly support the housing and homelessness provisions now included in the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act!
 
  • Sign NLIHC's Letter urging Congress to Include $100B in Emergency Rental Assistance in Next Coronavirus Relief Package.
 
 
Resources from the 5/20/20 Call
 

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 05/06/2020

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 05/06/2020
 
Speakers on 5/06/2020 Call
 
 
Please click the above link to contact your members of Congress today and ask them to ensure that the next stimulus package includes:
 
  • $11.5 billion in Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding. This combined with the $4 billion previously provided in the CARES Act will reach the funding level needed to expand access to emergency shelter, short-term rental assistance, and housing stabilization services;
  • $100 billion in rental assistance to keep people housed and ensure landlords, including low-income housing providers, have the income they need to continue to operate;
  • $8.5 billion to ensure that public housing authorities can continue to operate at full capacity;
  • A uniform, national moratorium on evictions and foreclosures;
  • Resources for housing counselors and legal services to help renters and homeowners stay housed; and a requirement that local communities follow guidance by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and institute a moratorium on homeless encampment sweeps.
  •  
Resources from 05/06/2020
As always, several resources were highlighted in the chat that are worth uplifting: 

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 4/22/2020

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 4/22/2020

Here is a link to the 4/22/2020 recording

 

Speakers from 4/22/2020:

  

Action Alert: Take action today and email your members of congress!

Ask them to ensure that the next stimulus package includes:

  • $11.5 billion in Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding. This combined with the $4 billion previously provided in the CARES Act will reach the funding level needed to expand access to emergency shelter, short-term rental assistance, and housing stabilization services;
  • A uniform, national moratorium on evictions and foreclosures; and
  • $100 billion in rental assistance to keep people housed and ensure landlords, including low-income housing providers, have the income they need to continue to operate.

 

Resources Highlighted: 

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 4/08/2020

Resources for Weekly COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Call - 04/08/2020

Here is a link to the recording of the 4/08/2020 call.

 

Speakers 04/08/2020

 

Tracking Federal Funding:  Here is a link to Denny Heck's bill, providing $100B for emergency rental assistance. 

Action Alert: Take action in support of this bill here

 

Resources Highlighted: 

COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Provider Stakeholder Call 3/25/2020

Weekly COVID-19 Housing and Homelessness Call - 03/25/2020

3-25-20 COVID-19 Call Recording

 

Speakers:

 As we continue to elevate the need and build the case for extending the eviction moratorium and appropriating rental assistance funding at the state and national level, we will need data and stories to present as evidence (even when to us the need is already clear). If you track data at your organization, or if you would like to help people share their stories, please connect with me ASAP at johns@wliha.org.

 

Executive Director Statement on Governor Inslee's Proposed Homelessness Investments

                                                                                  

 
For Immediate Release                                                                                                                             
Wednesday December 18, 2019

Download this statement here

      

Statement from Executive Director Rachael Myers on Governor Jay Inslee’s proposed investments in homelessness programs

 

At a time when the federal government is not only underfunding, but ignoring best practices for ending homelessness, we are extremely proud that our Governor is recommending significant new investments in the Housing and Essential Needs program, permanent supportive housing, shelter, and other critical homelessness interventions. 

 

The proposal will invest $146 million in the current budget and includes funding for enhanced shelter and for long term solutions including permanent supportive housing. It comes after last year’s historic appropriation of $175 million in the state Housing Trust Fund to build new affordable homes, and the creation of a new local funding source for cities and counties to use to build affordable homes in their communities (HB1406). This year we will also be asking the Legislature for an additional $10 million investment in the Housing Trust fund in order to prevent the loss of currently affordable homes.

 

Expanding shelter is necessary when people have nowhere to sleep tonight. Permanent housing is the solution to homelessness. Both are necessary investments and we applaud the Governor for recognizing that. We agree with Governor Inslee that Washington’s homelessness crisis is being driven by the sky-high rents across the state. Income inequality also underlies our crisis – as rent levels are set based on what upper income earning households can afford, middle- and lower-income households are left struggling to keep a roof over their heads. Many are not able to make it.

 

The unprecedented proposal for a deep investment in effective strategies to solve homelessness is bold, justified, and will be put to immediate use to keep people in their homes. We call on the Legislature to follow the Governor’s lead.

 

 

Rachael Myers

Executive Director

Washington Low Income Housing Alliance

Testifying in Olympia for the First Time: Advocates Share Their Experiences

By Karl Epps and Susan Olson

Karl Epps is a recipient of Housing and Essential Needs assistance in King County and a dedicated advocate. In addition to testifying on the House and Senate Operating Budgets this year, Karl spoke on a panel sharing his personal experience of homelessness and recovery with lawmakers, staff and media. He works at Amazon and plans to go back to film school.

Susan Olson serves on the State Advisory Council on Homelessness. Drawing on her own experience, she is a fierce advocate for those who have been incarcerated, struggled with substance use disorders, and experienced homelessness. This year, Susan testified for the first time on the Senate Operating Budget, urging lawmakers to fund HB 1406/Robinson. Susan is about to earn her B.S. in Human Services with a concentration in addiction.  

Before you gave testimony for the first time, what did you think it would be like?

Photo of Susan OlsonSusan: I had this feeling that it was going to be stuffy, and because I wasn’t a big lawyer or something, that my voice wouldn’t be valuable. And I was scared of the process because I had seen the videos but I had never sat through the process.

Karl: I thought it would be more intimate, and not so formal. I’ll admit I was a little apprehensive, but ultimately I was prepared for it because I was speaking from the heart. 

What was the most surprising part of the experience for you?

Karl: Definitely the time constraints. Having to crunch it down. And the fear of the unknown and speaking in front of people I don’t know. But once I got together with y’all [Housing Alliance staff] to collaborate, it helped me focus.

Also, people were actually genuine. I watch the news and look at all these politicians up in Washington, so that’s kind of what I thought it would be like. But people seemed to genuinely care, so I was pleasantly surprised by that!

Susan: The only thing I wasn’t prepared for was that it was a long day! [Note: The Senate Budget hearing had over 170 people signed up to testify and took over four hours.]

Why was giving testimony so important to you?

Photo of Karl EppsKarl: Basically it’s giving voice to the voiceless…I always felt that with the shiny houses up on the hill and people living under the bridges, it’s just not sustainable. And there’s more than enough to go around. My Mom, before she passed, had a job registering people of color to vote at the voter registration office. It’s something that she felt strongly about, advocacy for those that are underrepresented. I just wish she was there with me. Cause she would’ve spoken up too. 

Susan: My stepfather was the most amazing man I’ve ever met, and my mother was amazing. Unfortunately, they both passed while I was in active addiction. And now I’m getting ready to graduate and my parents couldn’t be here. During my testimony, I was wearing my step-father’s medicine bag. He wore that everyday. And in it were the ashes from my Mom and Dad. That testimony was the first time I’ve ever worn that because I wanted my parents with me. When I wore it, it had to be some for something very important, and that was very important. When I left after testifying, I can’t explain to you the peace I felt.

What is one thing you want people to know who might want to testify?

Karl: It matters. I know the idea of writing a letter is hard to do, or even an email or a phone call, but once you’re there you hear the stories, and you just never know who you’re going to affect. So get out there and tell your story because, until they see a human being, people might not be able to relate. If they see someone who went through treatment or who went through homelessness, who’s now working at Amazon and going to film school – like me – it can make all the difference. 

Susan: With my background of incarceration and addiction and all the other things in my history, we get to the point where we don’t think that we are valuable, our voices are not valuable, our experiences are not valuable. And that’s the farthest thing from the truth. This is a quote from Glenn Martin, the founder of JustLeadershipUSA: “The people closest to the problem are closest to the solution, but usually have the least amount of resources to do it.” And every time I do anything like this, I’m modeling resiliency and empowerment to the people that come behind me. That is very important.

Each legislative session, the Housing Alliance supports advocates to testify in Olympia on critical legislation related to housing and homelessness. This year, 34 different advocates testified on 21 different pieces of legislation, bringing the sorely-needed expertise of people with lived experience to improve state policy. Thank you to first-time testifiers Karl Epps and Susan Olson for sharing their experiences for this blog. You can hear Karl’s testimony from March 25th at the House Appropriations Committee here, and Susan’s testimony from April 1st  at the Senate Ways and Means Committee here.

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